Posts Tagged ‘stealing domain names’

Domain Theft and Stolen Domain Name Update

Monday, February 13th, 2012

We often hear “someone stole my domain name” from clients who fail to protect their registrant account with their domain name registrar.  Domain theft is extremely common.  Oftentimes, a stolen domain name arises from a webmaster, an IT employee or outside vendor who is in control of the domain registrant account, or has access to the registrant login with the registrar.  After a falling out, the ex-partner, employee, consultant, webmaster or web hosting company transfers the domain name from the true owner to their own control.  The first step in preventing domain theft is to control your domain registrant login account with your registrar of choice.

A stolen domain name can cost you big time.  Whoever controls the domain registrant information and login can point the DNS to whatever website they choose.  The person who has stolen your domain name can shut down your website instantaneously.

For many companies, domain theft can cost them tens, hundreds of thousands or millions of dollars in lost revenue.

Our domain name dispute attorneys can help you protect your domain name assets.  Contact us for more information.

Sillworks4@gmail.com also hacked persianwhois.com

Tuesday, January 17th, 2012

This is a post by Bjorn Kassoe Andersen, founder, owner and leader of Direction, a management and communications consulting company based in Denmark, which had its domain, direction.com, stolen back in 2006.

 

It appears that the person or persons who for a while succeeded in stealing direction.com are also active hackers. A google alert recently notified me about this incident where apparently www.persionwhois.com was defaced. www.zone-h.com Continue reading Sillworks4@gmail.com also hacked persianwhois.com »

New database for domain names reported stolen

Sunday, September 4th, 2011

This is a post from 09/04/2011 by Bjorn Kassoe Andersen, founder, owner and leader of Direction, a management and communications consulting company based in Denmark, which had its domain, direction.com, stolen back in 2006.


Here is a new option to report a domain name stolen and to check if a domain you are interested in has been reported stolen: http://www.domaintheft.org/ Continue reading New database for domain names reported stolen »

Sillworks4@gmail.com also hacked persianwhois.com

Tuesday, April 29th, 2008

This is a post from 04/29/2008 by Bjorn Kassoe Andersen, founder, owner and leader of Direction, a management and communications consulting company based in Denmark, which had its domain, direction.com, stolen back in 2006.

 

It appears that the person or persons who for a while took over direction.com are also hackers. A Google search recently made me aware of a defacement of persianwhois.com (captured by h-zone.net). It appears that sillworks4@gmail.com is operated by a hacker or hacker group called OurQuest – and for some reason the city of Shiraz is mentioned. Here is a screen dump of the defacement:

The text at the bottom is written in Iranian slang. It says something like: “What you are up to is queer and childish, you should rather go for the money.” Continue reading Sillworks4@gmail.com also hacked persianwhois.com »

Social engineering is the easiest way to steal domains

Saturday, March 8th, 2008

This is a post from 03/08/2008 by Bjorn Kassoe Andersen, founder, owner and leader of Direction, a management and communications consulting company based in Denmark, which had its domain, direction.com, stolen back in 2006.

 

It looks as if social engineering – that is: tricking people – is the easiest way for someone to steal a domain name. From the owner of sweet.com I received an email sent from sillworks4@gmail.com in which the sender pretends to be the legitimate owner of the domain and tries to trick the ISP to set up a forward in order to gain control over the domain.

I assume this was the method used also when our domain – direction.com – was stolen in late 2006 by someone operating also from sillworks4@gmail.com (and stillworks20@gmail.com). Here is how the email reads:

Hello Dear,

Thanks for nice services and support,

I’m tried many time to set mail forwarding for my email account, but page will not load after click on Submit button for set mail forwarding!!!

domain: SWEET.com

Tried to set: xxx@SWEET.COM forward to sillworks4@gmail.com So, Please check it and try to set this mail forwarding….and send me note when you have done it.

[the name of the administrator of sweet.com]

Thanks Again

 

Continue reading Social engineering is the easiest way to steal domains »

Danish Police does not investigate domain theft

Thursday, February 7th, 2008

This is a post from 02/07/2008 by Bjorn Kassoe Andersen, founder, owner and leader of Direction, a management and communications consulting company based in Denmark, which had its domain, direction.com, stolen back in 2006.

 

The other day I got a call from a local Danish police officer. This was nine months after I reported to the Danish National IT Crime Investigation Unit (NITEC) that our domain, direction.com, had been stolen. The local officer to whom the case had been referred was kind of sorry to say that he would not investigate the theft and that we would have to recover any losses through civil proceedings. Continue reading Danish Police does not investigate domain theft »

The economic incentive for stealing domains

Sunday, February 3rd, 2008

This is a post from 02/03/2008 by Bjorn Kassoe Andersen, founder, owner and leader of Direction, a management and communications consulting company based in Denmark, which had its domain, direction.com, stolen back in 2006.

 

On feb. 1, New York Times had a good article describing the development of the domain name industry – and the economic incentive for stealing domain names. Continue reading The economic incentive for stealing domains »

Our domain theft story now on podcast

Wednesday, January 30th, 2008

This is a post from 01/30/2008 by Bjorn Kassoe Andersen, founder, owner and leader of Direction, a management and communications consulting company based in Denmark, which had its domain, direction.com, stolen back in 2006.

Recently I was interviewed about how our domain was stolen and how we got it back. You can hear the interview as a podcast from VTalkRadio. Continue reading Our domain theft story now on podcast »

Domain theft happens every day

Saturday, December 1st, 2007

This is a post from 12/01/2007 by Bjorn Kassoe Andersen, founder, owner and leader of Direction, a management and communications consulting company based in Denmark, which had its domain, direction.com, stolen back in 2006.

 

Today I corresponded with Enrico Schaefer from Traverse Legal, a law company in Michigan that specializes in among other things domain theft. He wrote to me that the experience we had is common.  I didn’t hear anyone say that so clear before and it confirms that we are talking about a systemic problem which ICANN and registrars should address.  Check out his recommendations on how to protect domain names, he sees all the kinds of trouble people are getting into. Also, Wall Street Journal on September 25, 2007 ran an article with the headline Web-Address Theft Is Everyday Event. In the article, Bob Parsons, chief executive officer of GoDaddy.com says that hijacking occurs daily and that the frequency has increased as Internet use grows. Continue reading Domain theft happens every day »

Why doesn’t ICANN make a secure system?

Friday, November 16th, 2007

This is a post from 11/16/2007 by Bjorn Kassoe Andersen, founder, owner and leader of Direction, a management and communications consulting company based in Denmark, which had its domain, direction.com, stolen back in 2006.

 

Here is a simple fact: Your (valuable?) .com/.org/.net domain is only as secure as your mailbox. ICANN does not write this in their regulations but if you boil it all down, that’s how it is. Anyone who can hack your mailbox will be in control of your domain name. I wonder what exactly the companies with hugely valuable domain names are doing. I looked up who is taking care of google.com – and this nice little job is taken care of by markmonitor.com. Dropped them an email to ask if they could help me. Got no answer. Called them by phone, and yes, they could help if we had 100 domain names or more. I didn’t ask about the price. They probably have very good security. But why doesn’t ICANN stipulate that everyone who owns a domain name should be able to buy higher security as an option?

Facebook now asks me if I’m sick and tired of their antispam feature with the curly letters with lines through – and they propose that I authenticate my identity through an sms with a code they send to my mobile phone. That’s the kind of simple trick that ICANN could demand that all registars implement. As long all the security around domain names are running through only one rather insecure channel (our mailboxes) we will keep seeing a rise of domain thefts based on identity thefts. Why doesn’t ICANN change its policy? Continue reading Why doesn’t ICANN make a secure system? »

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